UNSOCIAL MEDIA

Isn’t it ironic, don’t you think, that we’ve all seemingly gravitated towards this collective self-loathing over our obsession with social media to the point that we are now posting admonishing or other finger-pointing-type memes about the pitfalls of said obsession on our social media platforms? 

Seriously, we’re like moths to a flame with our smart phones, tablets, laptops or whatever. If it’s there we have to look at it, even if what we’re looking at is utter drivel, which it mostly is. I saw one today – yes, I know – that said ‘We’re swamped by information yet devoid of wisdom’. How true! I mean, how many times can you watch that clip of an athlete falling down hard on a race, getting up and continuing to run, with the video clip culminating in treacle about her inspiration and heroism? 

I don’t know how many times as schoolboys my friends and I hit to dirt hard during sporting events, lost bark, bled, got concussed, got up and got on with it. No one filmed it. It wasn’t inspirational. It wasn’t heroic. It was just life. You might have been lucky enough for one of the parents to call out from the sidelines, ‘Up you get mate.’ And, off you’d go again. Do we really need to see that over and over? No, we don’t.

Read More
WONDER WOMAN

There are occasions in our lives when we have the good fortune of meeting people who are genuinely making a difference in the world, every day, without attention, accolade or reward. Sadly, those occasions are all too rare but when they do happen it is quite simply a privilege. When I deployed to East Timor in late 1999 on a humanitarian mission for CARE Australia, I met an incredibly humble, quietly spoken, hard-working, ridiculously smart Canadian nutrition specialist who had devoted her life to changing the lives of others. So, when I learned that this issue of GLOSS was to be all about ‘Game changers’, I couldn’t resist the opportunity to introduce you to a great friend of mine and real-time game changer, and there’s no better way for you to get to know her better than in her own words. 

So, ladies and gentlemen, please meet Allison Tuffs.

Read More
THE COMPLETE 180

There’s been a series of incredibly cool photos doing the rounds online this week featuring 31 year old Sean Connery and 26 year old Ursula Andress, shot between takes during the filming of the very first James Bond film, Dr No.

The pictures provide a ‘time and place’ snapshot of a barely known young Scottish actor clearly out to impress a stunningly beautiful, completely unknown Swiss actress, both totally at ease with each other while utterly oblivious to the international mega-stardom that was just weeks away.

Considering where that film took ultimately Connery and Ursula’s now iconic white bikini scene, what is so remarkable about the photos is the innocence of Connery’s adolescent displays of physical prowess while the clearly impressed Andress looks on. It suggests a time when life was much more simple.

Men were men. Women were women. Men wore the pants. Women hung around looking beautiful in bikinis and all it took to impress them were a few handstands. Good times. 

Read More
TEN ELEMENTS OF A CRACKING THRILLER

The act of writing stories can be less than glamorous – it’s more endless cups of tea and crumbs piling up on the keyboard in a darkened room (aka my writing mancave) than back-to-back launches and book signings with pen poised and a glass of red by my side. 

Those days when I am holed up in the mancave, churning out chapters of the latest Alex Morgan espionage adventure as fast as my clumsy two-finger typing skills can manage, I’m not consciously thinking about what makes a cracking thriller. It’s creating my own mix of preferred reading and viewing tastes, past experiences, a reasonable dash of instinct, and an intense need to extract the story from my head and get it onto the page. Then, of course everything is honed during the editing process with my publisher.

Once the books are put out into the world, there does seem – on reflection – to be some shared elements I recognise between my work and those of the other thriller writers I have grown up enjoying.

Read More
THE BEST OF INTREPID 2013

MOST POPULAR BLOG POSTS

With secret movie business underway, signed to Peony Literary Agency in Hong Kong, a trip to London & Los Angeles, and now to completing Avenger, my year’s been well and truly action-packed.

Around this time last year, I’d just re-released Defender and Hunter through Momentum.  

Soon, it’ll be the same for Avenger and I just hope that you'll enjoy this new story, featuring the first female Intrepid agent putting Alex Morgan through his paces as they track down the architects of human trafficking.

With the year that was, I'm looking forward to finishing Intrepid 3 and having a float around on the pool for a few hours, but this blog is a throwback to the posts you enjoyed the most.

Read More
Hunter... a year on

This post first appeared on the Momentum Books blog.

You know, it’s with a deep sense of melancholy that I put pen to paper today while I reflect on the first twelve months of Hunter.

As any writer knows, much of our work is drawn from inspirations around us, people and things we know, admire or even in some cases despise. Of particular note for me today, I am remembering an actor whose portrayal of a tough, no-bullshit, hard hitting ex-soldier made such a lasting impression on me as a young man that his signature character eventually became the foundation for my principal protagonist, the tough, no-bullshit, hard hitting ex-soldier – Alex Morgan.

The actor I am talking about is Lewis Collins who played Bodie alongside Martin Shaw’s Doyle in that iconic British crime drama of the late 70’s/early 80s The Professionals. Lewis, a former Parachute Regiment reservist in real life, went on to play another incredible character, Captain Peter Skellern, in a film called Who Dares Wins in 1982 and also auditioned for James Bond after Roger Moore’s retirement. Unfortunately, the Bond producer’s found him to be ‘too aggressive’ and cast Pierce Brosnan instead. Bollocks, Personally, I would have much preferred Lewis Collins[1].

Read More
CELEBRATING THE LAUNCH OF AMAZON.COM.AU

Amazon heads Down Under

Here at IntrepidHQ we see that Amazon have recently launched their amazon.com.au website - meaning you can now buy eBooks in AUD and there is a developing local presence for Aussie authors to party Amazon style.

CNet has reported that there are over two million ebooks with prices in Australian dollars — with over 700,000 titles under $4 and over 1.4 million under $10.

Amazon Kindle vice president Neil Lindsay says, "The new Kindle Store is customised for Australian customers, with local best sellers and curated lists relevant to Australians and many titles from local publishers and authors, such as Tim Winton, Karly Lane and Kate Morton."

So, we've come up with a new competition to celebrate Amazon Down Under. It combines some of our favourite things: talking about books and drinking beer. 

Read More